U.S. Particle Accelerator School
U.S. Particle Accelerator School
Education in Beam Physics and Accelerator Technology

Beam Loss and Machine Protection

Sponsor:

Northern Illinois University

Course Name:

Beam Loss and Machine Protection
This class is limited to 20 students

Instructors:

Rudiger Schmidt, Technical University Darmstadt; Jorg Wenninger, CERN; Doug Curry, Oak Ridge National Lab; Louis Emery, Argonne National Laboratory; Maxim Marchevsky, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab


Purpose and Audience
This course is intended for physicists and engineers who are or may be engaged in the design and/or operation of accelerators with high-power beams or accelerator systems with very large stored energy. At the completion of the course, participants should be able to understand the physical phenomena that can damage machine subsystems or interrupt operations and be capable of analyzing an accelerator facility to produce a register of technical risks and corresponding risk mitigation and management strategies.

Prerequisites
Upper division undergraduate-level courses in electromagnetism (at the level of Introduction to Electrodynamics by David J. Griffiths) and either of USPAS courses Fundamentals of Accelerator Physics and Technology with Simulations and Measurements Lab (undergraduate level) or Accelerator Physics (graduate level) or equivalent.

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that they meet the course prerequisites or have equivalent experience.

Objectives
Many particle accelerators operate with high beam power and high energy stored in particle beams as well as in magnet systems. In the future, beam power and stored energy in high-intensity accelerators is likely to further increase. Protecting the accelerator equipment from the consequences of uncontrolled release of this energy is essential. This course will explore methods and technologies to manage technical risks associated with accelerators with high-power beams or large stored energy.

Instructional Method
Many particle accelerators operate with high beam power and high energy stored in particle beams as well as in magnet systems. In the future, beam power and stored energy in high-intensity accelerators is likely to further increase. Protecting the accelerator equipment from the consequences of uncontrolled release of this energy is essential. This course will explore methods and technologies to manage technical risks associated with accelerators with high-power beams or large stored energy.

Course Content
During this course methods and technologies to identify, mitigate, monitor and manage the technical risks associated with the operation of accelerators with high-power beams or subsystems with large stored energy will be presented. Themes for the lectures are:

  1. What can go wrong?
  2. What are the consequences?
  3. Mitigation,
  4. Controls and operation,
  5. Safety engineering.

Specific topics we will cover include: beam dynamics and beam losses, beam material interaction leading to heating and activation, beam loss induced damage mechanisms and their calculation, beam transfer and fast kickers, detection of failures, beam cleaning and collimation, protection of superconducting magnets and other hardware, case studies in machine protection, and machine protection and operation.

Reading Requirements
(to be provided by the USPAS) "Proceedings of the 2014 Joint International Accelerator School: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection" Vol 2, CERN Yellow Paper (2016), edited by Rudiger Schmidt.

It is anticipated that the course will follow closely a previous version given in the Winter 2017 USPAS session. Students can prepare for the class or judge their fit for the course by reviewing materials there:  https://uspas.fnal.gov/materials/17UCDavis/davis-machineprotection.shtml

Credit Requirements
Student grades will be evaluated based on homework (30%) and case study assignments (70%).

USPAS Computer Requirements
There will be no Computer Lab and all participants are required to bring their own portable computer to access online course notes and computer resources.  This can be a laptop or a tablet with a sufficiently large screen and keyboard. Windows, Mac, and Linux-based systems that are wifi capable and have a standard web browser and mouse are all acceptable.  You should have privileges for software installs. If you are unable to bring a computer, please contact uspas@fnal.gov ASAP to request a laptop loan.  Very limited IT support and spare loaner laptops will be available during the session.


Northern Illinois University course number: PHYS 790D Special Topics in Physics - Beam Physics
Indiana University course number: Physics 671, Advanced Topics in Accelerator Physics
Michigan State University course number: PHY 963, "U.S. Particle Accelerator School"
MIT course number: 8.790, Accelerator Physics